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Bringing you the latest in career development and management strategies, trends, tips, insights and recommendations to put you on the leading edge of career know-how.

Learn the latest best practices on getting, managing, growing and transitioning your career for optimal success in a competitive and fast moving market!

Benefit from the combined wisdom of Joan's 20+ year successful corporate career plus the 10+ years as founder and principal of Great in 8 Coaching; working with clients on a daily basis.

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Job Search Checklist: 1949 vs. 2011

by Joan Tabb in Blog

Today’s job search check list is a bit different than yesterday’s and that awareness came to me when I thought to ask my mother how she got her first job out of college in 1949. She said, ‘simple’. She had a degree in  political science from a noted university but because her name was ‘Marilyn’ and not, say “Michael’, her choices were quite limited. In fact, no matter what her degree had been the key question that an interviewer would pose was, “How fast do you type?”

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Lessons on Happiness and its Causes

by Joan Tabb in Blog

(Please note: This is written by Dr. Robert Diswas-Diener and I just had to pass it along. He is the author of another piece I’ve included in my blog. Note the comment in point #1 that ‘Each individual voice matters.” Plays exactly to my last blog entry BE SEEN. BE HEARD —Joan)

There can be little question that the person who drew the largest applause at the 2,000+ attendance Happiness and its Causes conference last week in Australia was the Dalai Lama. Interestingly, His Holiness was only one of a luminary line-up of speakers that included Jane Goodall and B. Alan Wallace, among others.

 As you might expect there were a number of standout moments during the conference. Here is a recap of just a few highlights:

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How to Get the Most out of Working with Professional Associations for Career Advancement

by Joan Tabb in Blog

Person A

Person A is a recent college graduate with a degree in engineering. She is advised to get involved with a professional association as a way to make connections to launch her career. She diligently goes online and finds an engineering organization near her and also finds an upcoming program in her area of interest. She enrolls online, pays the $35. event fee and feels good that she is making progress. She drives to the event, signs in and awkwardly heads into the meeting room, and knowing no one, looks to buy a glass of wine ($5) and get some cheese and crackers. She nods hello to a couple of people standing around, then heads to the presentation area. The talk is somewhat interesting and when it’s over she tries to talk to the presenter but there are many people ahead of her so she calls it a night and goes home. Zero leads. Zero connections. And has spent $40 on entry and wine and about $10 on gas. Not a profitable or productive strategy for her job hunt!

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8 Tips for Moms Returning to Work

by Joan Tabb in Blog

1. Get together with some former co-workers who you like and trust. Tell them you are moving toward professional re-entry and really want to get your confidence back. Ask them to remind you of your professional skills and your real strengths and capabilities. Takes notes so you can reflect on it all later.  It’s amazing how quickly all that can be forgotten during the years away!

2. Think of 2-3 times in your professional life when you were really proud of your accomplishment; when you did something that had an impact and you played a significant role. Write out each scenario, think back to include specifics so it becomes ‘live’ to you again,  and then list the skills you demonstrated. 

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8 Smart Communication Strategies for Business Success

by Joan Tabb in Blog

1. Build bridges.

Start off any meeting or business interaction with what you and the other person/team have as a common goal. Perhaps if you’re both in the same company, you both strive to drive revenue. Start out the meeting with that fact in common. If it is you and your manager, start out with meeting the corporate or department’s goals. And then work toward that goal together in your interaction, despite some differences, start with common ground.

2Show respect and understanding.

Often misunderstandings are based on the other person doubting that you fully understand what their situation, goals and pressures are. Take a moment to think through the other person’s situation and articulate it back to them. Often, just by showing that you ‘get it’ it drives you closer together and helps in the process of working together.

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The ADD/ADHD Professional: Is That a Contradiction in Terms?

by Joan Tabb in Blog

Controversial title? Perhaps. But in my experience as a career coach the several clients I’ve had with ADD/ADHD really do have more extreme strengths and more extreme challenges than the norm. Each of them have benefited tremendously from the process of sorting through, reflecting and determining preferences, natural talents and areas of keen interest. And of course, there’s the vital though a bit painful process of sorting through what hasn’t worked and what skills need to be developed or inherent weaknesses need to be addressed. Especially with some extreme weaknesses, it’s crucial to know one’s  least favorite tasks and least favorite type of people and situations…those that clearly spell DANGER.

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8 Smart Ways to Manage Your Manager

by Joan Tabb in Blog

  1. Ask how their best employees communicate with them. Listen very carefully. Take notes. Emulate.
  1. Always send weekly status reports, whether they are requested or not. Even if your manager does not appear to use them, you will use them to track your progress and as input for your evaluations.
  1. Watch closely to learn your manager’s rhythms, best and worst times of day, times of the week and try to catch them at peak times. Try to schedule meetings with them when you know they tend to be in a better mood.
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